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Who is old enough to dance?

We begin dancers at age three. We use fun music to introduce beginning dancers to dance and work on right/left recognition and balance. Come join "Miss Puffy" and "Bert & Ernie" for a fun learning experience. BUT you are never to old to enjoy dance. We have classes for all ages from 3 to adult.

Go to our registration tab and click the link below, once you fill out the registration form you can submit it and we will have the information required to have your dancer signed up. 

If you have any questions you can  contact us by calling (605) 690-2390 or by e-mailing us at info@brookingstobroadway.com.

Why doesn't your studio do more creative movement/modern dance?

We feel that the basics of ballet and tap should be learned first. If you let a child move as they wish for two or three years and then tell them, "now you have to point your toe and you have to hold your arms like this," they find it more difficult. Once one has learned the basics they can then alter them to fit the choreography they desire. It is as simple as saying, "one needs to learn to walk before running."

We believe that pointe work should be begun when a child has reached an upper level of dance proficiency. As a general rule we require them to have at least six years of dance experience and two years of pre-pointe, generally by age twelve. Through research it has been found that if a child is placed on pointe before their bones have reached a certain level of maturity they can suffer injuries and later in life have caused irreparable damage to their hips, legs and ankles. We realize that every young dancer dreams of going on toe (pointe) at Brookings to Broadway we want to make those dreams come true, yet to us the dancer's safety and well being will always come first. See the article by Susan Sharkey R.A.D. on our Pointe Page.

Why do we only do one performance?

Our philosophy is this: At Brookings to Broadway we spend Sept-Dec. learning the basics of dance, if we take away from that time to learn a show dance we are missing out on important learning time. We spend Jan-May reinforcing the basics and learning the recital dances. Our studio recital is generally in May  where every dancer age 3 and up will perform their dance pieces.

Why does your studio choose not to compete?

We believe dance should be fun and educational without the pressure of competition. At Brookings to Broadway, dancers dance for themselves and their passion.Click the link to read a great article on why dance studios choose not to compete. Click Here!

Why do I have to take ballet?

Click on the link for another great article on why ballet is so important and not "boring"! Click Here! or Here!

#1 Pre-School dancers haven’t even learned to stand still; sometimes they just don’t have the patience to stand for as long as it would take to do a series of warm-up exercises at the barre.

#2 Alignment is crucial; pre-school dancers know that their heads must stay on top of their shoulders, but that’s about it. Shoulder-to-hip alignment will develop slowly, but may take two or three years for preschoolers to fully grasp. When you put pre-school dancers at a ballet barre, you are not allowing them to learn to develop their abdominals to align their bodies for themselves. In fact, you’re reversing their learning of shoulder-to-hip alignment by adding this unnecessary element and having them reach up to a barre, which will throw off their shoulder alignment.

#3Distraction can be a struggle. We mustn’t forget the most obvious reason for not using a barre: it’s a really easy distraction for preschoolers. Keeping their hands to themselves and standing still without fidgeting are already hard enough. When you add the ballet barre, they are now constantly dealing with the strong temptation to hang or pull on it throughout the whole class. This makes it much harder for them to focus on what they need to be doing. Listening to their teacher and following instructions is already a challenge for them; let’s not make it harder.

#4 Balance will take longer to develop. The ballet barre helps the dancer balance while performing highly technical and challenging barre work. For advanced dancers, it is a way to allow the dancer to zero in on their footwork without having to worry about balance. The barre is there for them in that situation. It’s already hard for the older students to not depend on the barre for balance. When they’re young, they need to learn to develop that balance on their own. Giving them a barre too early will create a heavy dependence on it and thus prevent the natural development of balance sans the ballet barre.

#5 They must learn to dance alone first. For the pre-school dancer, it is much more important that they understand the concept of balance without assistance first. Have them stand at their own spot on the floor. Allow enough space between them and the next dancer. Watch as they attempt to gain control and balance of their own bodies with their hands on their waist, and you will see why having them reach up to a ballet barre would only make things harder for them.

If you don’t already know this, you will soon learn it. Young dancers will sometimes spend their entire first year of ballet just learning how to sit up, stand up, sit down, and stand still. These basic skills can sometimes be very difficult for preschool-aged children to master. They just don’t have the patience to stand for as long as it would take to do a series of warm-up exercises at the barre.

2. Alignment is crucial.

The youngest students know that their heads must stay on top of their shoulders, but that’s about it. Shoulder-to-hip alignment will develop slowly, but may take two or three years for preschoolers to fully grasp. When you put this age group at a ballet barre, you are not allowing them to learn to develop their abdominals to align their bodies for themselves. In fact, you’re reversing their learning of shoulder-to-hip alignment by adding this unnecessary element and having them reach up to a barre, which will throw off their shoulder alignment.

3. Distraction can be a struggle.

We mustn’t forget the most obvious reason for not using a barre: it’s a really easy distraction for preschoolers. Keeping their hands to themselves and standing still without fidgeting are already hard enough. When you add the ballet barre, they are now constantly dealing with the strong temptation to hang or pull on it throughout the whole class. This makes it much harder for them to focus on what they need to be doing. Listening to their teacher and following instructions is already a challenge for them; let’s not make it harder.

4. Balance will take longer to develop.

The ballet barre helps the dancer balance while performing highly technical and challenging barre work. For advanced dancers, it is a way to allow the dancer to zero in on their footwork without having to worry about balance. The barre is there for them in that situation. It’s already hard for the older students to not depend on the barre for balance. When they’re young, they need to learn to develop that balance on their own. Giving them a barre too early will create a heavy dependence on it and thus prevent the natural development of balance sans the ballet barre.

5. They must learn to dance alone first.

For the younger dancer, it is much more important that they understand the concept of balance without assistance first. Have them stand at their own spot on the floor. Allow enough space between them and the next dancer. Watch as they attempt to gain control and balance of their own bodies with their hands on their waist, and you will see why having them reach up to a ballet barre would only make things harder for them.

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